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Dr. Andrian Marcus’ Work Honored as Most Influential Paper of 2007

A paper published in 2007 by UT Dallas computer science associate professor Dr. Andrian Marcus has been selected as the most influential paper from that year’s conference and was recognized at the 25th IEEE International Conference on Program Comprehension in Buenos Aires recently.

The paper, “Combining Formal Concept Analysis with Information Retrieval for Concept Location in Source Code,” was written by Marcus with his student, Denys Poshyvanyk, while both were at Wayne State University in Detroit.

Cited in 222 subsequent papers, Marcus and Poshyvanyk’s work addresses the problem of concept location in source code. They presented an approach that combines formal concept analysis and latent semantic indexing to organize different concepts and their relationships present in the subset of the search results.

The honor is Marcus’ third “most influential paper” award in three years, after 10-year recognition for the 2006 paper, “The Conceptual Coupling Metrics for Object-Oriented Systems” at the 32nd IEEE International Conference on Software Maintenance and Evolution; and for the 2004 paper, “An information retrieval approach to concept location in source code” at the 2014 IEEE CSMR-WCRE 2014 Software Evolution Week.


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The UT Dallas Computer Science program is one of the largest Computer Science departments in the United States with over 2,100 bachelor’s degree students, more than 1,000 MS master’s students, 150 Ph.D. students, and 86 faculty members, as of Fall 2016. With The University of Texas at Dallas’ unique history of starting as a graduate institution first, the CS Department is built on a legacy of valuing innovative research and providing advanced training for software engineers and computer scientists.

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