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Recent PhD Computer Science student is now an Assistant Professor

Dr. Yin Yang (yyang@ece.unm.edu) earned his BS degree in Jiangnan University in China and his PhD in Computer Science at UT Dallas in Texas.  He now does research in graphics simulation animation visualization and works as an assistant professor for the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of New Mexico.

He is truly appreciative of the environment the CS Department at UT Dallas provided for his PhD research.  “There are world-class research labs with state-of-the-art equipment, excellent  faculty and staff members, interesting talks from top researchers, smart students and lovely weekly mixers.  The professional training in research helped me a lot in my PhD.  I miss every single place on the UT Dallas campus and in the CS/EE building.”  Although he would probably not recommend this for most students, he remembers working on papers, when he was a student, on the “on the day before the deadline.”

Yang says the study and research training he received in the CS Department at UT Dallas gave him a “solid knowledge” in his area and made him “well prepared for a new and challenging academic life at the University of New Mexico.”

His current research interests include deformable model, physics-based animation/simulation, medical imaging analysis and visualization.  A few examples of his work are shown below.

Deformation streaming:  Reduce the DOF number as well as the streaming data size in networked environment using different simulation strategy. Package delay can be well-handled based on the linearized time integration formulation.
Deformation streaming: Reduce the DOF number as well as the streaming data size in networked environment using different simulation strategy. Package delay can be well-handled based on the linearized time integration formulation.
GPU-aided lung tumor tracking:  Fast tracking lung tumor for patients with radiation therapy. Precisely and timely tracked tumor movement pattern could help dose delivery with higher accurately. 1000 time performance acceleration is achieved with GPU based SAT.
GPU-aided lung tumor tracking: Fast tracking lung tumor for patients with radiation therapy. Precisely and timely tracked tumor movement pattern could help dose delivery with higher accurately. 1000 time performance acceleration is achieved with GPU based SAT.

More details and videos about the above projects and Dr. Yang’s other research are available on his website:   www.ece.unm.edu/~yyang/ .

The Department of Computer Science at UT Dallas [www.cs.utdallas.edu] is one of the largest CS departments in the United States with more than 750 undergraduate, 500 master, and 125 PhD students.  They are committed to exceptional teaching and research in a culture that is as daring as it is supportive.

 

 

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